Zoological collections are repositories of biological material that contain not only specimens, but information of the populations of each species, associated with climatic, edaphic data, etc. Helping in understanding the life of the planet. Relevant to public health, agriculture, industrial setore.s, etc. With the help of PPBio it was possible to collect several species of organisms that were deposited in the INPA zoological collection.

 

Amblypygi.

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They are rare arachnids, with few known species. They look a little scary because of the long pedipalpos with thorns, but they are harmless arachnids.

 

 

Opiliones.

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It is the fourth largest order of Arachnida, with approximately 6500 described species and is divided into four suborders: Cyphophtalmi, Dyspinoi, Eupnoi and Laniatores (Kury, 2015). They are nocturnal animals, harmless and very abundant, but they are little known by the public (Bonaldo, et al., 2009). They are usually found, under trunks, in bromeliads, foliaço, trunks and caves (Kury, 2011).

 
 

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The Pseudoscorpiones consist of one of the oldest lineages of terrestrial organisms, with records dating from the Devonian, about 410 million years ago (Shear et al., 1989; Shear, 1991). They are currently represented by 3385 species, 439 genera and 25 families (Harvey, 2007, 2008). They consist of small animals, ranging from 0.5 to 5mm and rarely exceed 7mm in length (Ruppert et al., 2005; Murienne et al., 2008).

 

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It is a small order of arachnids with few species distributed in the New and Old World. They have a hood-shaped structure, the cúculo, which covers the chelicerae.
Ricinoles are small inhabitants of litter and forest soil (Adis et al., 1989). The group has been considered rather rare, but the application of appropriate techniques for its capture has made the description of new species more frequent in recent years. On the other hand, many species are described based on a few specimens of geographically restricted locations.

 

Scorpiones

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ÉThe fifth largest order of arachnids, with about 1500 species described. Scorpions are easily recognizable by the body divided into two parts: cephalothorax and abdomen. Scorpions have a worldwide distribution, but are common in tropical and subtropical regions.

 

 

 

Text: Willians Porto

Photo Credit: Sidclay Dias

 

Zoological Collections.